Friday Follies #208 – Making Grammar Great Again, One Hyphen at a Time

Hi again, good-grammar lovers. Today we expose a few serious crimes uncovered by our intrepid Grammar Cop! 😃

  1. “The end result is probably one of the most deep biographical treatments of the comedian as tragic figure since Albert Goldman’s ‘Ladies and Gentlemen… Lenny Bruce!'” (TWO crimes here!)
  2. “Despite their impressive mane (which might make them appear larger than they’re actual weight of around 10 pounds)…”
  3. “He complimented Beets, saying she was amazing and ‘so down for that kind of improvisation, it never phased her, she was enthusiastic about the changes, she helped with dialogue for her character, it was a beautiful collaboration.'” (TWO crimes!)

 

The corrections:

  1. Doesn’t this look wrong to you: “most deep”? It did to the Grammar Cop. Regular adjectives of one syllable can usually take an ‘er or ‘est ending, so here it should say deepest. The second mistake is an instance of hyphen-o-phobia. This phrase needs hyphens inserted, in accordance with the intended meaning: comedian-as-tragic-figure.
  2. Noooooo! This is one of the Grammar Cop’s pet peeves. “They’re” is a contraction for “they are.” The correct word is the possessive form: their.
  3. Here’s a case of wrong-word-itis. It should say it never fazed her; i.e., it wasn’t an obstacle for her. The second egregious error here is the fact that the whole thing is a run-on sentence. It contains five commas, setting off what appear to be several distinct short sentences all glommed together. It should be rewritten with proper punctuation. Here’s one way: He complimented Beets, saying she was amazing and ‘so down for that kind of improvisation. It never fazed her. She was enthusiastic about the changes and helped with dialogue for her character; it was a beautiful collaboration.’

Hyphens, semicolons and conjunctions are your friends. Invite them in, serve them drinks. Enjoy!

2 thoughts on “Friday Follies #208 – Making Grammar Great Again, One Hyphen at a Time

  1. 1-A grammar double-murder! Tragic, indeed!
    2-Not impressed by bad grammar. (Although I would like to know what mystery creature they are writing about.)
    3-Another sentence so tragic that the Grammar Judge sentenced them to 10 days in jail.
    (How do these people actually have writing jobs?!) 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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