Friday Follies #195 – Making Grammar Great Again, One Hyphen at a Time

She’s baaaaack! The Grammar Cop has gathered some ghastly goofs for your inspection. Enjoy! 😄

  1. “After being informed of her complaints, the suit alleges Tohmé ensured Nejmeh everything went well and he did not feel the need to perform any tests.”
  2. “He pens a regular column in the largest circulation newspaper in Quebec, the Journal de Montreal, hosts a podcast and is a frequent guest on televized political panels.”
  3. “It’s unfortunate that the mayor and his group is not considering that heritage in allowing those shiny white buildings to be built.”

 

And the corrections:

  1. There are two mistakes here. First, the dangling modifier: “After being informed of her complaints” is supposed to modify Tohmé, not the suit (lawsuit). It’s not the suit that was informed, it was Mr. Tohmé. Second, “ensured”: This word is not meant to refer to a person. One does not “ensure” a person; rather, you assure someone. (I assure you I won’t be late. He assured her nothing was wrong. “Ensure” is used in an inanimate sense: I wore a raincoat to ensure that I wouldn’t get wet.) So the sentence above could be rewritten as: The suit alleges that after being informed of her complaints, Tohmé assured Nejmeh (that) everything went well and he did not feel the need to perform any tests.
  2. A little rewriting is in order here as well: “the largest circulation newspaper” is wrong. Change to the newspaper with the largest circulation. The word “podcast” is crying out for a comma after it. Either that, or better yet, break the whole sentence in two this way (and fix the abominable spelling of “televized” while you’re at it): He pens a regular column in the newspaper with the largest circulation in Quebec, the Journal de Montréal. He also hosts a podcast and is a frequent guest on televised political panels. (Note we must also add the accent in Montreal, since it’s part of this newspaper’s name.)
  3. What is the subject of this sentence? “The mayor and his group,” right. Two things are named. So why isn’t the verb plural, to match? Why does it say “is”? Bad writing, that’s why! The sentence should be It’s unfortunate that the mayor and his group are not considering that heritage in allowing those shiny white buildings to be built. And by the way, I have one thing to say to that mayor: Booooo! 😒

The Grammar Cop must rest now. Her work is done, and until next time we would like to wish you, in French: Bon weekend and bonne semaine! 😄

9 thoughts on “Friday Follies #195 – Making Grammar Great Again, One Hyphen at a Time

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